Użyj strzałek do przechodzenia między zakładkami

OPEN CALL: ARTISTIC PROJECTS FROM POLAND AND AUSTRIA

Austria

FIRST PRIZE
Reclaiming Abundance, Oliver Ressler

What might the world look like 30 years from now, once we manage to significantly reduce CO2 emissions? Oliver Ressler imagines the results of specific changes that need to take place on the road towards the human civilization becoming climate-neutral. He adapts the key segments of the global economy, related to industries responsible for the lion’s share of greenhouse gas emissions, to new, zero-emission regulations. His work gives us suggestions on how to design a world in which the de-carbonization of our economy, preserving our resources, and the co-existence of man and nature is actually possible.

That last aspect seems to be particularly important to the interventions which Ressler stages in meticulously selected spaces. The reintroduction of plants into places dominated by man, exploited and subjected to industrial violence, creates an opportunity to build a new relationship between people and nature, of which they are, after all, a constituent part. However, the artist is aware of the irreversible consequences of the climate crisis, which has already made an impact both locally and globally. Reclaiming Abundance rejuvenates our imaginations, by this point geared towards dystopia, offering positive scenarios, and opening a debate on the nature and limitations of the social and cultural changes that go hand in hand with scientific and technical efforts to transform our energy sector.

SECOND PRIZE
Amazon Air, Gottfried Halder

With every item bought online, we also receive air from the warehouses of the biggest Internet stores, “packaged” into little plastic bags that fill out the empty space in the cartons. Gottfried Haider commissioned a lab to analyze samples of this air. The analysis revealed traces of chemical compounds which are harmful to people’s health and the environment.

Amazon Air is an original and powerful metaphor of the “toxicity” of global trade, the long chain of excessive and mindless consumption, as well as corporate attempts to break and curtail workers’ rights.

Thanks to Haider’s work, perhaps now every time we open another package, we will be aware of the toxic void that accompanies the items we have ordered, like a symbolic receipt for our remote access to a globalized world. And perhaps in the future, we will venture to order less of that void, thus limiting our contribution to the growing dangers and injustice visited upon our natural and social environment as a result of unfettered consumerism.

II NAGRODA
Amazon Air, Gottfried Haider

Wraz z każdą rzeczą kupioną online trafia do nas powietrze z magazynów największych sklepów internetowych, „zapakowane” w woreczki zabezpieczające pustą przestrzeń w opakowaniach. Gottfried Haider zlecił laboratoryjną analizę próbek takiego powietrza. Wyniki ujawniły związki chemiczne szkodliwe dla zdrowia człowieka i środowiska.

Amazon Air to oryginalna i mocna metafora „toksyczności” globalnego handlu, długiego łańcucha nadmiernej, bezrefleksyjnej konsumpcji, a także korporacyjnych praktyk w zakresie łamania i prób ograniczania praw pracowniczych.

Dzięki pracy Haidera być może w każdej kolejnej odebranej przesyłce, oprócz zamawianych przedmiotów, zwrócimy uwagę na toksyczną pustkę, która trafia do nas wraz z nimi niczym symboliczny rachunek za zdalny dostęp do zglobalizowanego świata. I może w przyszłości będziemy tej pustki zamawiać mniej, nie zwiększając zagrożeń i niesprawiedliwości wynikających z wpływu niepohamowanego konsumpcjonizmu na środowisko – naturalne i społeczne.

OPEN CALL: ARTISTIC PROJECTS FROM POLAND AND AUSTRIA

Poland

FIRST PRIZE
#Gardenfit, Magdalena Mojsiejuk

The gradual return to a dynamic, intensive social life after the pandemic might turn out to be a rather peculiar experience. For a time, we are probably going to feel strange and anxious. Magdalena Mojsiejuk has noticed that these conditions offer a fertile ground for the creation of a new form of social life – one that combines urban gardening, fitness, and better neighborly relations. In Mojsiejuk’s vision, by creating and tending to collective gardens, we are integrating our community, improving our physical fitness, and bringing more locally sourced plant products (which are healthier and have a smaller carbon footprint) into our kitchens. All against the backdrop of green cities.

Mojsiejuk provocatively encourages us to imagine what could happen if we devoted to #Gardenfit the kind of money we spend on all the activities that are meant to improve our physical fitness – classes that, though already paid for, frequently remain in the realm of potentiality. With this spectacular project, the author shows us that these kinds of grassroots, culture-forming social initiatives have the potential to become a source of real, positive change. They can start trends that will permanently change local communities.

SECOND PRIZE
Things of Internet, Helena Maciukiewicz

In our everyday experience, the Internet seems immaterial – we reduce it to uploaded and downloaded content, overlooking the social and economic ramifications of its physical presence. This issue came into focus during the pandemic, when so many everyday things had to take place in the online world, replacing personal contact. We don’t usually think about the energy-consuming infrastructure that keeps the global computer network alive. We don’t think about how it affects the emission of greenhouse gases, an issue which recently became part of public discourse thanks to the blockchain technology.

Things of Internet directs our attention to the negative environmental impact of ubiquitous digitization. By showing the material dimension of the Internet, Maciukiewicz’s interactive installation stimulates our emotions and imagination, encouraging us to analyze our Internet habits. It offers us tips on how to approach it more responsibly, and how to be more conscious of using technology. The more we know about the environmental aspect of using devices connected to the Internet, the better our chances are of successfully countering the actions of purely profit-driven tech corporations, such as introducing new regulations that are harmful to people and the environment.

OPEN CALL: ARTISTIC PROJECTS FROM POLAND AND AUSTRIA

Poland

FIRST PRIZE
#Gardenfit, Magdalena Mojsiejuk

The gradual return to a dynamic, intensive social life after the pandemic might turn out to be a rather peculiar experience. For a time, we are probably going to feel strange and anxious. Magdalena Mojsiejuk has noticed that these conditions offer a fertile ground for the creation of a new form of social life – one that combines urban gardening, fitness, and better neighborly relations. In Mojsiejuk’s vision, by creating and tending to collective gardens, we are integrating our community, improving our physical fitness, and bringing more locally sourced plant products (which are healthier and have a smaller carbon footprint) into our kitchens. All against the backdrop of green cities.

Mojsiejuk provocatively encourages us to imagine what could happen if we devoted to #Gardenfit the kind of money we spend on all the activities that are meant to improve our physical fitness – classes that, though already paid for, frequently remain in the realm of potentiality. With this spectacular project, the author shows us that these kinds of grassroots, culture-forming social initiatives have the potential to become a source of real, positive change. They can start trends that will permanently change local communities.

SECOND PRIZE
Things of Internet, Helena Maciukiewicz

In our everyday experience, the Internet seems immaterial – we reduce it to uploaded and downloaded content, overlooking the social and economic ramifications of its physical presence. This issue came into focus during the pandemic, when so many everyday things had to take place in the online world, replacing personal contact. We don’t usually think about the energy-consuming infrastructure that keeps the global computer network alive. We don’t think about how it affects the emission of greenhouse gases, an issue which recently became part of public discourse thanks to the blockchain technology.

Things of Internet directs our attention to the negative environmental impact of ubiquitous digitization. By showing the material dimension of the Internet, Maciukiewicz’s interactive installation stimulates our emotions and imagination, encouraging us to analyze our Internet habits. It offers us tips on how to approach it more responsibly, and how to be more conscious of using technology. The more we know about the environmental aspect of using devices connected to the Internet, the better our chances are of successfully countering the actions of purely profit-driven tech corporations, such as introducing new regulations that are harmful to people and the environment.

Open call: projekty artystyczne z Polski i Austrii

Austria

I NAGRODA
Reclaiming Abundance, Oliver Ressler

Jak może wyglądać świat za 30 lat, kiedy uda się znacznie zmniejszyć emisje CO2? Oliver Ressler wyobraża sobie rezultaty konkretnych zmian, jakie muszą zajść na drodze do neutralności klimatycznej cywilizacji człowieka. Miejsca kluczowe dla globalnej gospodarki, wiążące się dziś z gałęziami przemysłu odpowiedzialnymi za znaczną część emisji gazów cieplarnianych, Ressler wizualnie adaptuje do nowych, zeroemisyjnych reguł. Jego prace podpowiadają, jak projektować świat, w którym możliwe jest zdekarbonizowanie gospodarki, oszczędzanie zasobów oraz współistnienie ludzi i przyrody.

Ten ostatni aspekt wydaje się szczególnie ważny dla interwencji, których Ressler dokonuje w precyzyjnie wybranych przestrzeniach. Ponowne wprowadzenie roślinności w miejsca opanowane przez człowieka, wyeksploatowane, poddane industrialnej przemocy stwarza możliwość wypracowania nowych relacji ludzi z przyrodą, której przecież sami są częścią. Przy czym artysta jest świadomy nieodwracalnych konsekwencji kryzysu klimatycznego, który zdążył odcisnąć lokalne i globalne piętno. Projekt Reclaiming Abundance wspomaga przyzwyczajoną raczej do dystopii wyobraźnię pozytywnymi scenariuszami i otwiera dyskusję dotyczącą charakteru i ograniczeń społeczno-kulturowych zmian, jakie idą w parze z interwencjami naukowo-technicznymi w zakresie transformacji energetycznej.

II NAGRODA
Amazon Air, Gottfried Haider

Wraz z każdą rzeczą kupioną online trafia do nas powietrze z magazynów największych sklepów internetowych, „zapakowane” w woreczki zabezpieczające pustą przestrzeń w opakowaniach. Gottfried Haider zlecił laboratoryjną analizę próbek takiego powietrza. Wyniki ujawniły związki chemiczne szkodliwe dla zdrowia człowieka i środowiska.

Amazon Air to oryginalna i mocna metafora „toksyczności” globalnego handlu, długiego łańcucha nadmiernej, bezrefleksyjnej konsumpcji, a także korporacyjnych praktyk w zakresie łamania i prób ograniczania praw pracowniczych.

Dzięki pracy Haidera być może w każdej kolejnej odebranej przesyłce, oprócz zamawianych przedmiotów, zwrócimy uwagę na toksyczną pustkę, która trafia do nas wraz z nimi niczym symboliczny rachunek za zdalny dostęp do zglobalizowanego świata. I może w przyszłości będziemy tej pustki zamawiać mniej, nie zwiększając zagrożeń i niesprawiedliwości wynikających z wpływu niepohamowanego konsumpcjonizmu na środowisko – naturalne i społeczne.

Polska

I NAGRODA
#Gardenfit, Magdalena Mojsiejuk

Stopniowe wracanie do dynamicznego, intensywnego życia społecznego po pandemii może okazać się dość osobliwym doświadczeniem. Przez pewien czas prawdopodobnie będziemy się czuć niepewnie i dziwnie. Magdalena Mojsiejuk dostrzegła w tych warunkach podatny grunt dla stworzenia nowej formy społecznego życia – łączącej miejskie ogrodnictwo, fitness oraz lepsze kontakty sąsiedzkie. W wizji Mojsiejuk, zakładając i uprawiając wspólne ogrody, integrujemy swoją społeczność, dbamy o kondycję fizyczną, a w naszym jadłospisie pojawia się więcej lokalnych produktów roślinnych (a zatem zdrowszych i o niższym śladzie węglowym). Wszystko to w otoczeniu zielonych miast.

Mojsiejuk prowokacyjnie zachęca nas do wyobrażenia sobie, co mogłoby się stać, gdybyśmy na kampanię #Gardenfit przeznaczyli podobne kwoty, jak te, które przeznaczamy na wszelkie zajęcia mające nam zapewnić dobrą kondycję fizyczną – zajęcia, które, mimo że opłacone, często pozostają jedynie planami. Tym spekulatywnym projektem autorka pokazuje, że tego rodzaju oddolne, kulturotwórcze działania społecznościowe mają potencjał stawania się źródłem realnych, pozytywnych zmian. Mogą one zapoczątkować trendy, które trwale zmienią lokalne społeczności.

II NAGRODA
Things of Internet, Helena Maciukiewicz

W doświadczeniu potocznym internet wydaje się niematerialny – sprowadzamy go do odbieranych i wysyłanych treści, pomijając społeczno-ekonomiczne konsekwencje jego fizyczności. Proces ten uwidocznił się w czasie pandemii, kiedy tak wiele codziennych spraw musiało odbywać się w świecie online, zastępując bezpośredni kontakt. Na co dzień nie zastanawiamy się nad energochłonną infrastrukturą, dzięki której globalna sieć komputerowa może w ogóle istnieć. Nie myślimy o tym, jak wpływa ona na emisję gazów cieplarnianych, o czym w ostatnim czasie było głośno choćby w kontekście technologii blockchain.

Things of Internet zwraca uwagę na negatywne konsekwencje środowiskowe wszechobecnej cyfryzacji. Interaktywna instalacja Maciukiewicz, ukazując materialny wymiar internetu, oddziałuje na wyobraźnię i emocje, zachęcając do analizy własnych nawyków korzystania z sieci. Podpowiada, jak robić to bardziej odpowiedzialnie, jak bardziej świadomie używać technologii. Im więcej będziemy wiedzieć o środowiskowym kontekście korzystania z urządzeń podpiętych do internetu, tym realniejsze są szanse na skuteczne przeciwstawianie się działaniom nastawionych wyłącznie na zysk korporacji technologicznych, w tym doprowadzaniu do ustanawiania szkodliwych dla ludzi i natury regulacji prawnych.